Catherine Arrese

Catherine Arrese - Alliance Manager Research Development Adviser, UWA

Catherine Arrese

Alliance Manager Research Development Adviser, UWA

State or Territory:

  • Western Australia

Primary position including institution/organisation:

  • Research Development Adviser, The University of Western Australia

About Dr Catherine Arrese

  • Dr Catherine Arrese is a Research Development Adviser at the Women and Infants Research Foundation (WIRF) and The University of Western Australia’s Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, both based at King Edward Memorial Hospital.
  • She graduated in Specialised Education from the Ecole of Formation Psychop├ędagogique (Paris VI, France) prior to moving to Perth, where she completed a Bachelor of Science with Honours, followed by a PhD, at UWA. She undertook her postdoctoral research at the UWA School of Biological Sciences, after being awarded two consecutive Australian Research Council Fellowships enabling her to lead an independent research program.
  • In 2008, Catherine was recruited as a Research Development Adviser to the Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, where she has been working in close collaboration with Professor John Newnham. She has been central to the expansion of the research capabilities on the campus.
  • Catherine is also the Manager of the Australian Preterm Birth Prevention Alliance founded following the success of the Western Australian Preterm Birth Prevention Initiative and the award of an NHMRC Partnership Grant involving Western Australia, New South Wales and Victoria.

Why does preventing early birth matter to you?  

"Many preterm babies face life-long health, intellectual or developmental problems that will limit their quality of life and have a devastating impact on their families. Aside from the trauma to individuals, the social and financial costs of preterm birth are substantial. To me, it is startling and unacceptable that each year 8% of Australian pregnancies (14% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island pregnancies), that is approximately 24,000 babies and their families, will be affected by this leading cause of death and disabilities in children up to five years of age. The path to preterm birth prevention is challenging but worthwhile if we can avert even if only a small proportion and give babies a healthy start to life."
The path to preterm birth prevention is challenging but worthwhile if we can avert even if only a small proportion and give babies a healthy start to life.